Sales

Sales

Have a Plan for Your Backend Sales 

Every good marketer knows how important it is to increase the lifetime value of the customer.  It’s much cheaper to make a sale to a previous customer than it is to get a new one onboard.  The cost of acquiring new customers can be high, but getting more money out of existing customers won’t cost you a penny.

Building a backend to your business isn’t hard but without one, you’re limiting your financial potential.  A backend is how you continue selling to an existing customer. Let’s say you sell an eBook on how to make money blogging.

Your eBook could discuss what a blog is, how to set one up, and how to make money from it.  Your backend sales could come from affiliate items (if you don’t feel like taking the product creation route again) or a new eBook, membership site, or video/audio package you sell.

Whenever you first start selling online, always think of complementary topics you can tack on as a backend. For our example, your backend sales could be about social networking on other web 2.0 sites like Squidoo, MySpace, or bookmarking sites.

After they’ve begun seeing success, your backend sales could focus on more paid methods of marketing, such as AdWords.  You progress your offers with your audience like stepping stones, moving from the first logical starting point to a more advanced stage.

Plop your offers right into your autoresponder system and it’ll automatically cater to the needs of your subscribers the longer they stay on your list. Another common way to add a backend onto a product is to offer personal coaching. 

Personal coaching can be expensive, sometimes costing thousands of dollars per month.  A lot of marketers offer this as a backend strategy, giving them the potential to significantly increase the return on their investment (ROI) of acquiring the prospect.

If you take care to create backend offers that add value to their needs and which are of top quality, they’ll continue buying from you. If you promote anything and everything just for the sake of cashing in, they’ll lose trust in you.

Your backend sales strategy isn’t all done just through your autoresponders. You can put links to backend products on your “thank you” pages.  And don’t forget that each product can act as a backend item for another one. So you might start with an eBook about MySpace and then use a blogging eBook as your backend item for the customer.

Just make sure you don’t set yourself up for limited profits by using a single product without implementing a backend strategy that will work to increase your ROI over and over again. You’re building a business, not dabbling in a few hit or miss sales.

Writing Good Sales Copy 

Learning to write good sales copy isn’t something you can learn by reading a quick tutorial – it takes practice.  Although you probably won’t turn into a world-famous copywriter overnight, there are a few tips you can use to increase the response from your sales letters.

The first thing you should learn is that the headline is (almost) everything.  If your headline is terrible – or worse – boring, most people won’t even read the rest of your sales letter.  A headline needs to be exciting, enticing, and intriguing. 

It needs to grab the attention of your visitor quickly. Your headline might have shock value, ask a compelling question, or be the beginning of an extremely interesting story.  “Six months ago, I was living on the streets of L.A., homeless after my Adjustable Rate Mortgage soared so high I couldn’t make the mortgage payments, but now I’m living in a sky-rise apartment twenty stories up that I paid seven figures for…”

This makes the reader want to know more – how did this person go from being destitute to being wealthy?  Good sales copy usually tells a story that the audience can connect with.  Copy ideally shouldn’t tell a fictional story, though. 

You certainly don’t want to run into any trouble with the FTC or an attorney general with something to prove.  Good copy gives people a reason to keep reading.  If you tell an interesting, compelling story that’s somehow related to the product and how it will affect them, it will naturally appeal to your visitor.

Every single paragraph should lead into the next paragraph, drawing the reader further and further into the pitch.  Consumers usually buy based on emotion, and then they justify their purchase with logic.  They rarely buy based on logic alone. 

They don’t buy a product because of the features – they buy because of the benefits it will provide to them, the WIIFM (What’s In It For Me) factor.  If you’re selling a car, you can’t tell the buyer that it has Corinthian leather seats, ABS brakes, and a superior sound system. 

You have to sell them on the fact that their neighbors and coworkers will be envious, girls will flock to them, and they’ll feel like the king of the world whenever they drive it.  Then they’ll buy based on the fantasy you’ve just given them, and they’ll use logic to justify their purchase later.

Within each online sales letter, you’ll want to have a main headline, numerous sub-headlines sprinkled throughout, and aside form the written storyline, you’ll want to add sections of benefit-driven bullet points that break up the monotonous text.

Don’t forget the call to action at the end and a Post Script (PS) or two that sums up the order in case they’re bona fide skimmers who hate to read. Go to some of your favorite sales pitch sites and emulate their style and approach. Bookmark it for your “swipe file,” where you borrow ideas (not content) from the original author and use it on your own target audience.